Walking

The Inishowen Gateway Hotel in Donegal is located in one of the most scenic locations in Ireland, perfect for walking breaks Ireland.

Download the local walking routes here


Buncrana Shore Path

Overview The Buncrana Shore-path is a traffic free walk which follows the shoreline of Lough Swilly between Buncrana and Stragill Strand. It is a gently undulating path which passes quiet beaches, old forts and a number of sites of historic interest. Wildlife is abundant and the views in all directions are superb.

 

Swan Park

Swan Park occupies a delightful riverside site on the edge of Buncrana. A linear Park it follows the course of the River Crana from Wilson’s Bridge at its north-eastern extremity to the point where a small stream, crossed by a miniature hump back bridge, joins the Crana. This little bridge marks the south-western end of the feature. The Park is a little over a quarter of a mile long and is nowhere wider than forty yards Buncrana Shore Path. From Crana Bridge to Ned's Point past Porthaw Beach to Fr. Hegarty's Rock onto Stragill Beach - Approx 3 kilometres. With Buncrana surrounded by hills, we suggest the Urris hills or follow some of the network of bog roads, where you will experience a relaxing level of tranquillity.

 

Fort Dunree Walks

This is a series of three signposted walks around the former military fort complex at Fort Dunree Military museum. Ranging from an easy walk along the cliff tops to a more strenuous climb up steep steps to the summit of the hill, the walks offer unrivalled views across Lough Swilly. The walks are complemented by detailed information panels, seating and picnic areas and timber shelters.

 

Mamore Gap

Once the sole gateway between Buncrana and Urris, at the crest of this steep road a number of holy relics are to be found, a holy well dedicated to St. Eigne and locals hold an annual mass on this site August 15th in commemoration of Pagan Times.

 

Glenevin Waterfall

Waterfall, located one mile from Clonmany, the walk up Glenevin Valley to the waterfall takes the rambler on a safe, well sign-posted route; footbridges are dotted along the track to allow you to cross the stream. The waterfall is wedge shaped and cascades fresh mountain water over black rock from a height of 30ft.

 

Inishowen Head Walk

This spectacular walk follows through some of Donegal's most impressive scenery. Within a short distance from the trail head you are in a remote county with spectacular views.

 

Inch Wildflower Reserve

That atmosphere of being neither island nor mainland in Inishowen extends to little Inch Island, a gently domed green hummock in the throat of Lough Swilly. Inch lies tethered to the western edge of the isthmus by two straight, slim embankments. Built by the Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway in the 1850s, remarked Andrew Speer, regional manager of the National Parks and Wildlife Service, as we stood on the long-disused Letterkenny railway line, looking across the water to Inch. Much to our benefit today, not to mention the birds.